Crossville Chronicle, Crossville, TN

November 2, 2012

Victims disappear; so does state's case

By Michael R. Moser
Editor

CROSSVILLE — State prosecutors knew where victims of two separate kidnappings — one a rape case — were when they were incarcerated. Problem is, both victims have disappeared since being released from jail and so has the case against the defendant.

As a result, the state and defense attorney reached a plea agreement in the two cases that allows the defendant to walk away with time served, once he completes his probation violation sentence from General Sessions Court.

"I don't want to but I will say yes," Alfred Leon Wilson told Judge David Patterson when asked if he was pleading guilty.

Patterson responded by telling Wilson he did not have to plead guilty and that he would not accept the guilty plea unless Wilson was willingly admitting to his guilt to the reduced charges in the two cases.

"I just want to get out of here and get back to my mowing business," Wilson told the judge.

Wilson was indicted by the grand jury on June 5 on a charge of aggravated rape and kidnapping in connection with an incident that occurred on New Year's Eve 2011 during which Wilson allegedly drove a Chattanooga man to his Claysville Rd. residence under the guise of paying him for yard work.

Once there, the man claimed Wilson held him against his will and raped him.

In the other case, Wilson was indicted by the grand jury in September 2011 and charged with kidnapping. He was accused in the indictment of holding at his home against his will a Chattanooga man.

Wilson was facing up to a total of 30 years in prison if found guilty of all three charges and the sentences were ordered to be served consecutively.

Under terms of the sentencing agreement struck between Assistant District Attorney Amanda Hunter and Assistant Public Defender John Nisbet, Wilson pleaded guilty to the lesser charges of two counts of attempted kidnapping and received a two-year sentence with credit for 237 days already served, and the balance to be served on probation.

The rape charge was dropped.

When Patterson asked Hunter to read into the record the details of the crimes, Wilson objected.

"Do we have to read them out loud again, and embarrass me more?" Wilson asked the court. Earlier in the day, motions filed in the case were discussed in open court, during which details of the crimes were discussed.

Patterson replied that since he had already heard evidence relating to the case during the motions arguments, any further reading of details could be waived.

When asked again, how did he wish to plead, Wilson responded, "A big fat guilty."

Wilson still must serve the balance of an 11-month and 29-day probation violation sentence stemming from a theft of more than $500 charge in General Sessions Court.